Top-Level Menus

Add a Top-Level Menu Add a Top-Level Menu

To add a new Top-level menu to WordPress Administration, use the add_menu_page() function.

<?php
add_menu_page(
    string $page_title,
    string $menu_title,
    string $capability,
    string $menu_slug,
    callable $function = '',
    string $icon_url = '',
    int $position = null
);

Example Example

Lets say we want to add a new Top-level menu called “WPOrg”.

The first step will be creating a function which will output the HTML. In this function we will perform the necessary security checks and render the options we’ve registered using the Settings API.

Note:

We recommend wrapping your HTML using a <div> with a class of wrap.

<?php
function wporg_options_page_html() {
    // check user capabilities
    if ( ! current_user_can( 'manage_options' ) ) {
        return;
    }
    ?>
    <div class="wrap">
      <h1><?php esc_html( get_admin_page_title() ); ?></h1>
      <form action="options.php" method="post">
        <?php
        // output security fields for the registered setting "wporg_options"
        settings_fields( 'wporg_options' );
        // output setting sections and their fields
        // (sections are registered for "wporg", each field is registered to a specific section)
        do_settings_sections( 'wporg' );
        // output save settings button
        submit_button( 'Save Settings' );
        ?>
      </form>
    </div>
    <?php
}
?>

The second step will be registering our WPOrg menu. The registration needs to occur during the admin_menu action hook.

<?php
function wporg_options_page() {
    add_menu_page(
        'WPOrg',
        'WPOrg Options',
        'manage_options',
        'wporg',
        'wporg_options_page_html',
        plugin_dir_url(__FILE__) . 'images/icon_wporg.png',
        20
    );
}
add_action( 'admin_menu', 'wporg_options_page' );
?>

For a list of parameters and what each do please see the add_menu_page() in the reference.

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Using a PHP File for HTML Using a PHP File for HTML

The best practice for portable code would be to create a Callback that requires/includes your PHP file.

For the sake of completeness and helping you understand legacy code, we will show another way: passing a PHP file path as the $menu_slug parameter with an null $function parameter.

<?php
function wporg_options_page() {
    add_menu_page(
        'WPOrg',
        'WPOrg Options',
        'manage_options',
        plugin_dir_path(__FILE__) . 'admin/view.php',
        null,
        plugin_dir_url(__FILE__) . 'images/icon_wporg.png',
        20
    );
}
add_action( 'admin_menu', 'wporg_options_page' );
?>

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Remove a Top-Level Menu Remove a Top-Level Menu

To remove a registered menu from WordPress Administration, use the remove_menu_page() function.

<?php
remove_menu_page(
    string $menu_slug
);
?>

Warning:
Removing menus won’t prevent users accessing them directly.
This should never be used as a way to restrict user capabilities.

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Example Example

Lets say we want to remove the “Tools” menu from.

<?php
function wporg_remove_options_page() {
    remove_menu_page( 'tools.php' );
}
add_action( 'admin_menu', 'wporg_remove_options_page', 99 );
?>

Make sure that the menu have been registered with the admin_menu hook before attempting to remove, specify a higher priority number for add_action().

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Submitting forms Submitting forms

To process the submissions of forms on options pages, you will need two things:

  1. Use the URL of the page as the action attribute of the form.
  2. Add a hook with the slug, returned by add_menu_page.

Note:
You only need to follow those steps if you are manually creating forms in the back-end. The Settings API is the recommended way to do this.

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Form action attribute Form action attribute

Use the $menu_slug parameter of the options page as the first parameter of menu_page_url(). By the function will automatically escape URL and echo it by default, so you can directly use it within the <form> tag:

<form action="<?php menu_page_url( 'wporg' ) ?>" method="post">

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Processing the form Processing the form

The $function you specify while adding the page will only be called once it is time to display the page, which makes it inappropriate if you need to send headers (ex. redirects) back to the browser.

add_menu_page returns a $hookname, and WordPress triggers the "load-$hookname" action before any HTML output. You can use this to assign a function, which could process the form.

Note:
"load-$hookname" will be executed every time before an options page will be displayed, even when the form is not being submitted.

With the return parameter and action in mind, the example from above would like this:

function wporg_options_page() {
	$hookname = add_menu_page(
		'WPOrg',
		'WPOrg Options',
		'manage_options',
		'wporg',
		'wporg_options_page_html',
		plugin_dir_url(__FILE__) . 'images/icon_wporg.png',
		20
	);

	add_action( 'load-' . $hookname, 'wporg_options_page_submit' );
}
add_action( 'admin_menu', 'wporg_options_page' );

You can program wporg_options_page_submit according to your needs, but keep in mind that you must manually perform all necessary checks, including:

  1. Whether the form is being submitted ('POST' === $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] ).
  2. CSRF verification
  3. Validation
  4. Sanitization