Block Filters Edit

To modify the behavior of existing blocks, WordPress exposes several APIs:

Registration Registration

The following filters are available to extend the settings for blocks during their registration.

block_type_metadata block_type_metadata

Filters the raw metadata loaded from the block.json file when registering a block type on the server with PHP. It allows applying modifications before the metadata gets processed.

The filter takes one param:

  • $metadata (array) – metadata loaded from block.json for registering a block type.

Example:

<?php

function filter_metadata_registration( $metadata ) {
    $metadata['apiVersion'] = 1;
    return $metadata;
};
add_filter( 'block_type_metadata', 'filter_metadata_registration' );

register_block_type( __DIR__ );

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block_type_metadata_settings block_type_metadata_settings

Filters the settings determined from the processed block type metadata. It makes it possible to apply custom modifications using the block metadata that isn’t handled by default.

The filter takes two params:

  • $settings (array) – Array of determined settings for registering a block type.
  • $metadata (array) – Metadata loaded from the block.json file.

Example:

function filter_metadata_registration( $settings, $metadata ) {
    $settings['api_version'] = $metadata['apiVersion'] + 1;
    return $settings;
};
add_filter( 'block_type_metadata_settings', 'filter_metadata_registration', 10, 2 );

register_block_type( __DIR__ );

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blocks.registerBlockType blocks.registerBlockType

Used to filter the block settings when registering the block on the client with JavaScript. It receives the block settings and the name of the registered block as arguments. This filter is also applied to each of a block’s deprecated settings.

Example:

Ensure that List blocks are saved with the canonical generated class name (wp-block-list):

function addListBlockClassName( settings, name ) {
    if ( name !== 'core/list' ) {
        return settings;
    }

    return lodash.assign( {}, settings, {
        supports: lodash.assign( {}, settings.supports, {
            className: true,
        } ),
    } );
}

wp.hooks.addFilter(
    'blocks.registerBlockType',
    'my-plugin/class-names/list-block',
    addListBlockClassName
);

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Block Editor Block Editor

The following filters are available to change the behavior of blocks while editing in the block editor.

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blocks.getSaveElement blocks.getSaveElement

A filter that applies to the result of a block’s save function. This filter is used to replace or extend the element, for example using wp.element.cloneElement to modify the element’s props or replace its children, or returning an entirely new element.

The filter’s callback receives an element, a block type and the block attributes as arguments. It should return an element.

blocks.getSaveContent.extraProps blocks.getSaveContent.extraProps

A filter that applies to all blocks returning a WP Element in the save function. This filter is used to add extra props to the root element of the save function. For example: to add a className, an id, or any valid prop for this element.

The filter receives the current save element’s props, a block type and the block attributes as arguments. It should return a props object.

Example:

Adding a background by default to all blocks.

function addBackgroundColorStyle( props ) {
    return lodash.assign( props, { style: { backgroundColor: 'red' } } );
}

wp.hooks.addFilter(
    'blocks.getSaveContent.extraProps',
    'my-plugin/add-background-color-style',
    addBackgroundColorStyle
);

Note: A block validation error will occur if this filter modifies existing content the next time the post is edited. The editor verifies that the content stored in the post matches the content output by the save() function.

To avoid this validation error, use render_block server-side to modify existing post content instead of this filter. See render_block documentation.

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blocks.getBlockDefaultClassName blocks.getBlockDefaultClassName

Generated HTML classes for blocks follow the wp-block-{name} nomenclature. This filter allows to provide an alternative class name.

Example:

// Our filter function
function setBlockCustomClassName( className, blockName ) {
    return blockName === 'core/code' ? 'my-plugin-code' : className;
}

// Adding the filter
wp.hooks.addFilter(
    'blocks.getBlockDefaultClassName',
    'my-plugin/set-block-custom-class-name',
    setBlockCustomClassName
);

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blocks.switchToBlockType.transformedBlock blocks.switchToBlockType.transformedBlock

Used to filter an individual transform result from block transformation. All of the original blocks are passed since transformations are many-to-many, not one-to-one.

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blocks.getBlockAttributes blocks.getBlockAttributes

Called immediately after the default parsing of a block’s attributes and before validation to allow a plugin to manipulate attribute values in time for validation and/or the initial values rendering of the block in the editor.

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editor.BlockEdit editor.BlockEdit

Used to modify the block’s edit component. It receives the original block BlockEdit component and returns a new wrapped component.

Example:

const { createHigherOrderComponent } = wp.compose;
const { Fragment } = wp.element;
const { InspectorControls } = wp.blockEditor;
const { PanelBody } = wp.components;

const withInspectorControls = createHigherOrderComponent( ( BlockEdit ) => {
    return ( props ) => {
        return (
            <Fragment>
                <BlockEdit { ...props } />
                <InspectorControls>
                    <PanelBody>My custom control</PanelBody>
                </InspectorControls>
            </Fragment>
        );
    };
}, 'withInspectorControl' );

wp.hooks.addFilter(
    'editor.BlockEdit',
    'my-plugin/with-inspector-controls',
    withInspectorControls
);
var el = wp.element.createElement;

var withInspectorControls = wp.compose.createHigherOrderComponent( function (
    BlockEdit
) {
    return function ( props ) {
        return el(
            wp.element.Fragment,
            {},
            el( BlockEdit, props ),
            el(
                wp.blockEditor.InspectorControls,
                {},
                el( wp.components.PanelBody, {}, 'My custom control' )
            )
        );
    };
},
'withInspectorControls' );

wp.hooks.addFilter(
    'editor.BlockEdit',
    'my-plugin/with-inspector-controls',
    withInspectorControls
);

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editor.BlockListBlock editor.BlockListBlock

Used to modify the block’s wrapper component containing the block’s edit component and all toolbars. It receives the original BlockListBlock component and returns a new wrapped component.

Example:

const { createHigherOrderComponent } = wp.compose;

const withClientIdClassName = createHigherOrderComponent(
    ( BlockListBlock ) => {
        return ( props ) => {
            return (
                <BlockListBlock
                    { ...props }
                    className={ 'block-' + props.clientId }
                />
            );
        };
    },
    'withClientIdClassName'
);

wp.hooks.addFilter(
    'editor.BlockListBlock',
    'my-plugin/with-client-id-class-name',
    withClientIdClassName
);
var el = wp.element.createElement;

var withClientIdClassName = wp.compose.createHigherOrderComponent( function (
    BlockListBlock
) {
    return function ( props ) {
        var newProps = lodash.assign( {}, props, {
            className: 'block-' + props.clientId,
        } );

        return el( BlockListBlock, newProps );
    };
},
'withClientIdClassName' );

wp.hooks.addFilter(
    'editor.BlockListBlock',
    'my-plugin/with-client-id-class-name',
    withClientIdClassName
);

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Removing Blocks Removing Blocks

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Using a deny list Using a deny list

Adding blocks is easy enough, removing them is as easy. Plugin or theme authors have the possibility to “unregister” blocks.

// my-plugin.js
import { unregisterBlockType } from '@wordpress/blocks';
import domReady from '@wordpress/dom-ready';

domReady( function () {
    unregisterBlockType( 'core/verse' );
} );
// my-plugin.js
wp.domReady( function () {
    wp.blocks.unregisterBlockType( 'core/verse' );
} );

and load this script in the Editor

<?php
// my-plugin.php

function my_plugin_deny_list_blocks() {
    wp_enqueue_script(
        'my-plugin-deny-list-blocks',
        plugins_url( 'my-plugin.js', __FILE__ ),
        array( 'wp-blocks', 'wp-dom-ready', 'wp-edit-post' )
    );
}
add_action( 'enqueue_block_editor_assets', 'my_plugin_deny_list_blocks' );

Important: When unregistering a block, there can be a race condition on which code runs first: registering the block, or unregistering the block. You want your unregister code to run last. The way to do that is specify the component that is registering the block as a dependency, in this case wp-edit-post. Additionally, using wp.domReady() ensures the unregister code runs once the dom is loaded.

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Using an allow list Using an allow list

If you want to disable all blocks except an allow list, you can adapt the script above like so:

// my-plugin.js

var allowedBlocks = [
    'core/paragraph',
    'core/image',
    'core/html',
    'core/freeform',
];

wp.blocks.getBlockTypes().forEach( function ( blockType ) {
    if ( allowedBlocks.indexOf( blockType.name ) === -1 ) {
        wp.blocks.unregisterBlockType( blockType.name );
    }
} );

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Hiding blocks from the inserter Hiding blocks from the inserter

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allowed_block_types_all allowed_block_types_all

Note: Before WordPress 5.8 known as allowed_block_types. In the case when you want to support older versions of WordPress you might need a way to detect which filter should be used – the deprecated one vs the new one. The recommended way to proceed is to check if the WP_Block_Editor_Context class exists.

On the server, you can filter the list of blocks shown in the inserter using the allowed_block_types_all filter. You can return either true (all block types supported), false (no block types supported), or an array of block type names to allow. You can also use the second provided param $editor_context to filter block types based on its content.

<?php
// my-plugin.php

function filter_allowed_block_types_when_post_provided( $allowed_block_types, $editor_context ) {
    if ( ! empty( $editor_context->post ) ) {
        return array( 'core/paragraph', 'core/heading' );
    }
    return $allowed_block_types;
}

add_filter( 'allowed_block_types_all', 'filter_allowed_block_types_when_post_provided', 10, 2 );

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Managing block categories Managing block categories

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block_categories_all block_categories_all

Note: Before WordPress 5.8 known as block_categories. In the case when you want to support older versions of WordPress you might need a way to detect which filter should be used – the deprecated one vs the new one. The recommended way to proceed is to check if the WP_Block_Editor_Context class exists.

It is possible to filter the list of default block categories using the block_categories_all filter. You can do it on the server by implementing a function which returns a list of categories. It is going to be used during blocks registration and to group blocks in the inserter. You can also use the second provided param $editor_context to filter the based on its content.

<?php
// my-plugin.php

function filter_block_categories_when_post_provided( $block_categories, $editor_context ) {
    if ( ! empty( $editor_context->post ) ) {
        array_push(
            $block_categories,
            array(
                'slug'  => 'custom-category',
                'title' => __( 'Custom Category', 'custom-plugin' ),
                'icon'  => null,
            )
        );
    }
    return $block_categories;
}

add_filter( 'block_categories_all', 'filter_block_categories_when_post_provided', 10, 2 );

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wp.blocks.updateCategory wp.blocks.updateCategory

You can also display an icon with your block category by setting an icon attribute. The value can be the slug of a WordPress Dashicon.

You can also set a custom icon in SVG format. To do so, the icon should be rendered and set on the frontend, so it can make use of WordPress SVG, allowing mobile compatibility and making the icon more accessible.

To set an SVG icon for the category shown in the previous example, add the following example JavaScript code to the editor calling wp.blocks.updateCategory e.g:

( function () {
    var el = wp.element.createElement;
    var SVG = wp.primitives.SVG;
    var circle = el( 'circle', {
        cx: 10,
        cy: 10,
        r: 10,
        fill: 'red',
        stroke: 'blue',
        strokeWidth: '10',
    } );
    var svgIcon = el(
        SVG,
        { width: 20, height: 20, viewBox: '0 0 20 20' },
        circle
    );
    wp.blocks.updateCategory( 'my-category', { icon: svgIcon } );
} )();